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Black & Veatch to make Mumbai recycled water masterplan

Mumbai : US-based engineering and construction major Black & Veatch has said it has secured a contract from Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (MCGM) to prepare a detailed strategic masterplan for recycled water.

The MCGM is looking to ensure long-term water supply in the greater Mumbai region, which has witnessed rapid urban growth in the past several years.

The masterplan will create a vision for the next 50 years. The municipal entity is of the view that using tertiary treated effluent could potentially defer the need for additional water supply projects, preserve raw water resources, and pave the way for sustainable growth.

Also, in view of new discharge standards by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), the municipal body is planning to include tertiary treatment for a portion of the flow, and recycle the tertiary treated effluent for non‐potable reuse.

MCGM’s vision is to maximize the use of tertiary treated effluent, over the next 50 years, in order to offset fresh water demand and alleviate the anticipated deficit in water supplies. Using tertiary treated effluent could potentially defer the need for additional water supply projects, preserve raw water resources, and pave the way for sustainable growth.

"Water reuse is a win-win for Mumbai," said Black & Veatch India Managing Director Anand Pattani.

"Treating wastewater to a tertiary standard provides significant health and environmental benefits. Reusing that treated wastewater could relieve the pressure on the city's potable water supply", he added.

Black & Veatch said it will deliver the project by using its local and global expertise.

The recycled water masterplan contract marks the second major project win for Black & Veatch from MCGM in the past one years.

In May 2016, the company was awarded a consultancy contract to prepare a detailed project report (DPR) and tender documents for MCGM's wastewater treatment facility for Malad zone.

The project, once commissioned, is likely to be one of India’s largest in terms of treatment capacity.

Several municipal agencies in India are looking to treat wastewater and effluent for non-potable use to ease pressure on the city's water supplies. For instance, Delhi Jal Board's (DJB) masterplan for 2020 includes using treated wastewater for non-potable uses including for horticulture.

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